Fandom

Comic books in the media Wiki

DC COMICS: 1967 FILMATION SUPERMAN/AQUAMAN HOUR

4,615pages on
this wiki
Add New Page
Comments0 Share

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.

Dcsuperheroesfilmation

60 CARTOON SERIES

DC COMICS IN THE MEDIA

DC COMICS FIRST WAVE

G.I. COMBAT


The Superman/Aquaman Hour of Adventure is a Filmation animated series that aired on CBS from 1967 to 1968. Premiering on September 9, 1967, this 60-minute program included a series of six-minute adventures featuring various DC Comics Super Heroes.

OVERVIEWEdit

Each episode consisted of new segments from the existing series, The New Adventures of Superman and The Adventures of Superboy, as well as outings for Aquaman and his sidekick Aqualad. Superman fans generally regard it as the second season of The New Adventures. As a part of The New Adventures, it is notable for containing some of the final work done by Bud Collyer, the voice actor who had originated the roles of Superman and Clark Kent on radio.  It also included a rotating series of 'guest star' cartoons featuring the Atom, the Flash and Kid Flash, the Green Lantern, Hawkman and new shorts from The Adventures of Superboy. The Justice League of America (Atom, Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman, Aquaman and Superman) and Teen Titans (Speedy, Kid Flash, Wonder Girl, and Aqualad, but not Robin) were also featured in team adventures.

Many of the shorts were penned and script-edited by DC Comics employees. Bob Haney and George Kashdan — the writing-editing team who were then producing the original version of the Teen Titans comic book — were prolific on the series, taking on nearly all the "guest star" cartoons. Mort Weisinger, editor of all Superman comic titles during the 1960s, served as script editor for the shorts featuring Kal-El. This use of comic writers on the television series tended to make them "a very faithful adaption to the comic book mythos." Even so, there were some elements which were unique to the cartoons, such as secondary characters in the Hawkman, Green Lantern and Atom shorts.

This series marked the animation debut of nearly all of its featured characters and teams. The exceptions were Superman and his supporting cast, who had been previously immortalized in the iconic 1940s Superman shorts (and later in The New Adventures of Superman), and the Superboy characters, seen in the previous season of The Adventures of Superboy.

SUPERMANEdit

These adventures were the first time that Superman (and his guise of Clark Kent), Lois Lane and Perry White had been seen in animated form since they were immortalized in the Superman short films of the 1940s.

The first TV series produced by Filmation Associates, The New Adventures of Superman was extremely popular in its Saturday morning time slot and, despite having obviously been developed for young children, employed the services of several DC comic book writers including George Kashdan. Many of the character designs (later based upon the artwork of Superman artist Curt Swan in the show's third season) stayed true to their comic book counterparts; iconic shirt-rip shots and related transformations from Clark Kent into Superman were incorporated into almost every episode, and such lines as "Up, up, and away!" and "This is a job for Superman!" were also borrowed from comics and the original Superman radio show. In addition, this series marked the animation debut of Jimmy Olsen and classic Superman villains such as Lex Luthor, Brainiac, Toyman, Prankster, Titano, Mister Mxyzptlk as well as the inclusion of new villains like the Warlock and the Sorcerer. Due to a limited production budget, stock animation was often re-used for certain shots of Superman flying (or switching identities from Clark Kent into the Man of Steel), while character movement was often kept at a minimum; this would later become a trademark of Filmation's animated productions.

Producer Lou Scheimer also recruited Bud Collyer and Joan Alexander, veterans from the Superman radio show and, at least in Collyer's case, the Max Fleischer Superman cartoons, for the voices of Clark Kent/Superman and Lois Lane respectively. Jackson Beck, who had been the narrator and the voice of Perry White on the radio show, reprised those same roles for the cartoon version, while Jack Grimes, who had played Jimmy Olsen in its later years, took that part here as well. For this series, Collyer returned to the same vocal technique he'd perfected on the radio show to play the Man of Steel. While in the identity of Clark Kent, Collyer would keep his voice lighter while projecting a sense of weakness. But when the mild-mannered reporter would change into his true identity of Superman, Collyer's voice would deepen dramatically into a heroic baritone. Alexander departed after the first season and was replaced by Julie Bennett in later seasons.[1] The theme music for the show was composed by John Gart.

Despite its success, the series raised the ire of a conservative organization called Action for Children's Television, a grassroots organization formed in 1968 and dedicated to improving the quality of television programming offered to children, due to Superman throwing punches and other action-related violence which the group found objectionable. As a result, the series was soon cancelled, and future cartoons would not allow for such comic book violence.[2]

Superman subsequently appeared in ABC's long-running animated series Super Friends (1973), produced by Hanna-Barbera, whose rights to DC Comics characters were gradually transferred from Filmation.

SUPERBOYEdit

The Adventures of Superboy is a series of six-minute animated Superboy cartoons produced by Filmation that were broadcast on CBS between 1966 and 1969. The 34 segments appeared as part of three different programs during that time, packaged with similar shorts featuring The New Adventures of Superman other DC Comics superheroes.

These adventures marked the animation debut of Superboy, as well as his teenage alter ego Clark Kent, who acted as the bespectacled, mild-mannered disguise for the young hero, Lana Lang, and Krypto the super-powered dog who would accompany his master on every dangerous mission. Other characters such as Pa and Ma Kent, foster parents of the Boy of Steel, and the town of Smallville were also faithfully recreated from comic book adventures. As a result of the production's budget, the show featured a great amount of stock animation as well as limited movement from the characters.

Each episode featured the Boy of Steel ducking out of high school and racing into action to battle a wide array of adversaries, from dognappers in "Krypto, K-9 Detective," androids run amok in "The Revolt of Robotville," and alien menaces in "The Spy from Outer Space," to another young hero with similar powers in "Superboy Meets Mighty Lad," and a slew of otherworldly monsters ("The Deep Sea Dragon," "Visitor from the Earth's Core"). He even wound up being captured and successfully having to fight a gang of small-time crooks—all while in his disguise as Clark Kent—in "The Gorilla Gang." Most of the stories were written by DC writers such as Bob Haney and George Kashdan, while character designs were based closely upon the Superboy comic books of the time.

DC SUPERHEROESEdit

  1. Invasion of the Beetle-Men - Alien insects land outside a nuclear plant to destroy the station.
  2. The Plant Master - A criminal scientist gives life to plants for malevolent purposes.
  3. The House of Doom - A scientist teams with an alien warlord.

The Flash (and Kid Flash)

  1. The Chemo-Creature - A radiation experiment gone wrong creates a powerful creature out of an ordinary ant.
  2. Take a Giant Step - A criminal scientist unleashes a powerful robot to battle The Flash and Kid Flash.
  3. To Catch a Blue Bolt - Blue Bolt, an alien being with the same superspeed as The Flash, attacks the Earth.

Green Lantern

  1. Evil is as Evil Does - The Guardians of the Universe summon Green Lantern to battle Evil Star, a criminal with superpowers identical to Green Lantern's.
  2. The Vanishing World - A space fugitive captures Kairo to divert Green Lantern from a breakout of prisoners on a penal planet.
  3. Sirena, Empress of Evil - An alien queen attacks the planet Oa.

Hawkman

  1. Peril from Pluto - Hawkman must fly to Pluto to defeat an interplanetary brigand whose laser ray is decimating Earth.
  2. A Visit to Venus - Octo-armed aliens capture a manned space probe and use it to lure Hawkman to a trap.
  3. The Twenty Third Dimension - Malevolent pranksters from Jupiter use teleportation rays on Hawkman and their jailers.

Justice League of America

  1. Between Two Armies - The warring factions of the Rock People and the Crystal People from Mercury use Earth as a base for their conflict. The Justice League must bring peace to the warring factions before Earth ends up in the crossfire.
  2. Target Earth - A criminal warlord named Rom-Nex uses a gravity device to attack Earth. The Justice League are warned in time by a rebel named Val-Kar.
  3. Bad Day on Black Mountain - A malevolent warlord named Mastermind lures the Justice League to a trap on a mammoth desert mesa so that they will not interfere in his plans to take over Earth.

Teen Titans

  1. The Monster Machine - An unmanned spaceship unleashes multi-armed robots to attack Earth.
  2. The Space Beast Round-Up - Alien hunters must jettison vicious creatures else their damaged craft will crash, and the Titans must find the now-rampaging beasts.
  3. Operation: Rescue

DC SUPER HEROES unproduced showsEdit

Blackhawks

Blackhawk press sheet


Filmation planed on a season two of the DC Superhero this time the solo heroes were going to be Adam Strange, Blackhawks and Metamorpho the Element Man.  The show was caneclled so these characters never went into production. 

Also on Fandom

Random Wiki